IBM Japan Health Insurance Association

IBM Japan Health Insurance Association

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When visiting a bonesetter's clinic or osteopathic clinic

You might use a bonesetter's clinic or osteopathic clinic to treat a sprain or bruise. However, the extent of cases in which you can use health insurance at such clinics is very limited, since a bonesetter's clinic or osteopathic clinic is not an insurance medical care facility and the judotherapists who provide such care are not physicians.

Cases in which you can use health insurance

You can use health insurance only for acute, traumatic injuries and only in the following five cases:

● Sprains ● Bruises ● Contusions (such as pulled muscles) ● Bone fractures ● Dislocations

Cases in which you cannot use health insurance

Since you cannot use health insurance in the following cases, you must cover the entire cost of treatment yourself.

  • Case 1

    You receive a massage at a nearby osteopathic clinic because you ran a marathon and extreme muscle pain in your foot makes it hard to walk.
    You cannot use health insurance for medical treatment of mere stiff shoulders or muscular fatigue.
  • Case 2

    You are treated at an osteopathic clinic for a knee injury dating back from several years ago that flared up again.
    You cannot use health insurance for cases such as aftereffects of past injuries or traffic accidents.
  • Case 3

    You visit an osteopathic clinic in the hopes of speeding recovery from an injury for which you are currently being treated at a medical care institution.
    You cannot use health insurance at the osteopathic clinic if you are being treated for the same injury at a medical care institution.
  • Case 4

    You repeatedly visit an osteopathic clinic to treat long-term joint pain.
    You cannot use health insurance for treatment with no specific aim and no signs of improvement over extended periods.
  • Case 5

    You visit an osteopathic clinic for pain attributable to conditions like neuralgia or rheumatism.
    You cannot use health insurance to treat pain or other conditions caused by an illness or injury for which treatment at a medical care institution is more appropriate.
  • Case 6

    You are taken to a nearby osteopathic clinic for a bone fracture sustained on your way home from work.
    Worker's Accident Compensation Insurance covers injuries sustained while commuting or at the workplace and similar cases. See this page for more information.

Be sure to check the specific information concerning your treatment

In principle, the costs for treatment at an osteopathic clinic or a bonesetter's clinic are handled as “Medical Care Expenses” for which the patient must pay the entire amount him or herself, then apply to the Health Insurance Association for reimbursement of 70% of the amount. However, for convenience, a judotherapist working at an osteopathic clinic or a bonesetter's clinic that has concluded an agreement with the prefecture may apply for direct payment of medical care expenses. In such cases, you will simply pay a copayment of 30% in principle, just like at an insurance medical care facility.

Even if the judotherapist applies directly for payment, note that you must sign or affix your seal to “the Application Form for Medical Care Expenses”. When requesting payment in this way, be sure to check to confirm that information (e.g., cause and location of the injury) is correct. (Do not sign blank applications.)

Be sure to obtain a receipt

Osteopathic clinics and bonesetter's clinics are required to issue receipts free of charge. Always obtain a receipt, just as if you were undergoing treatment at a medical care institution.

While the receipt will ideally provide detailed indications of the amount of each treatment item to allow future review of treatment specifics, a detailed receipt may cost extra in certain cases.

Caution:

The Health Insurance Association may inquire about details of treatment and other matters.
After you have undergone treatment at an osteopathic clinic or a bonesetter's clinic using your health insurance card, the Health Insurance Association may inquire at a later day about matters such as the details and progress of treatment, and the cause of injury. We ask for your understanding of and cooperation with such inquiries. They are intended to ensure appropriate use of your insurance premiums.

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